Adopt and Implement the UN Declaration

Now is the crucial time to Adopt and Implement the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples.

We're building a movement of united voices from across the country who are committed to seeing the UN Declaration fully adopted and implemented.

Indigenous Peoples have been pushing for the Declaration for over 30 years - and the issues have not been resolved during that time.

Will you add your voice to the calls for Canada to move forward on a path - not just towards reconciliation, but a path towards equality and justice?

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    In 1982, the United Nations began work on a document to protect the human rights of Indigenous Peoples globally. It took them 25 years to finish that work.

    The United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples was eventually adopted by the UN in 2007 – with Canada voting against it. It was finally endorsed by Canada in 2010.

    Canada has stated that they would put into place the recommendations of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission, which call for the Declaration to be adopted and implemented.

    Canada now has the chance to become a world leader upholding Indigenous rights by fully standing behind this seminal document.

    This Declaration would go a long way to establishing a new relationship between Canada and Indigenous Peoples, and go a long way to improving the lives of Indigenous Peoples.

    We call upon the Canadian government to fully adopt and implement the Declaration, and stand up for the rights of Indigenous Peoples. We call on Canada to adopt Bill C-262 to this effect.

    Will you sign?

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    Indigenous nations have sought to assert jurisdiction in their territories since the first settler arrived. Whether through trade, treaty, negotiations, the courts, or via blockade, that demand has been crystal clear. Canadian governments have responded with a variety of half-measures, from the land claim system to consultation guidelines, or open violence and criminalization. Almost always, conflict endures.

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